Riveting Things

ask away   23. Portland State University. Sociology. Nerd. Artist. Student. Liberal. Dork. This is what I find fascinating, beautiful, and/or important.

godzillapanda:

This is the best thing I have seen all day

(Source: captainstormwind, via -lovelymoon)

— 2 days ago with 73954 notes
hwighting:

Claude MonetWater Lillies (1907)Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

hwighting:

Claude Monet
Water Lillies (1907)

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

(via impressionsonmymind)

— 2 days ago with 18109 notes
femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
As the Tate writes, Thomas Benjamin Kennington “was well known for his compelling pictures of the urban poor.”
Kennington painted Homeless in 1890.
He takes a bit of a risk in composing such a deliberately moving scene—he expects to buy with a captured moment what Dickens, for example, purchases with whole chapters of exposition—but to me, Kennington just manages to pull it off.
You might take the woman in black to be the child’s mother, but her mourning clothes are too elegant, her hair too presentable.
She is, for all we can tell, a perfect stranger, who has dropped her bundle of laundry and herself to the wet pavement in order to lift this boy from the pavement—his hat remaining where his head lay moments before.
His weak but arresting gaze is the only sign of life left in him.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

As the Tate writes, Thomas Benjamin Kennington “was well known for his compelling pictures of the urban poor.”

Kennington painted Homeless in 1890.

He takes a bit of a risk in composing such a deliberately moving scene—he expects to buy with a captured moment what Dickens, for example, purchases with whole chapters of exposition—but to me, Kennington just manages to pull it off.

You might take the woman in black to be the child’s mother, but her mourning clothes are too elegant, her hair too presentable.

She is, for all we can tell, a perfect stranger, who has dropped her bundle of laundry and herself to the wet pavement in order to lift this boy from the pavement—his hat remaining where his head lay moments before.

His weak but arresting gaze is the only sign of life left in him.

(via chadwys)

— 3 days ago with 628 notes

philamuseum:

We discovered some Museum visitors that look an awful lot alike the artworks they are looking at. Coincidence? Which artwork at the Museum best suits your style?

The Ballet Class,” c. 1880, Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas

White and Black,” 1955, Ellsworth Kelly, Collection of the artist © Ellsworth Kelly

A Wheatfield on a Summer’s Afternoon,” 1942, Marc Chagall © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Untitled XXI,” 1982, Willem de Kooning © The Willem de Kooning Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Red,” 1955-56, Sam Francis © Samuel L. Francis Foundation, California / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Umpferstedt II,” 1914, Lyonel Feininger © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

(via impressionsonmymind)

— 3 days ago with 932 notes
"Art and love are the same thing: It’s the process of seeing yourself in things that are not you."
Chuck Klosterman (via m-uir)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject, via impressionsonmymind)

— 3 days ago with 11369 notes
ilovecharts:

curiosamathematica:

The Google trend for the search query “quadratic formula”.
It repeats in the same pattern every year. Down in summer, up in September, down again in December and up again in spring time before going down again in the summer. And so it goes on forever.

via livingonabear

ilovecharts:

curiosamathematica:

The Google trend for the search query “quadratic formula”.

It repeats in the same pattern every year. Down in summer, up in September, down again in December and up again in spring time before going down again in the summer. And so it goes on forever.

via 

— 3 days ago with 65480 notes
micdotcom:

Forget the spreadsheet, here’s an easy flowchart to know if a women owes you sex

Microsoft Excel took a turn for the explicit this week when the Internet learned the once-innocuous office tool was being used in a dispiriting new bro-trend: using the software to track of the number of times their partners refuse sex. Yes, #sexspreadsheets are a thing, presumably because some men still believe that owning of a penis entitles them to unlimited sexy times.
Sorry, guys, that’s just not the way the world works | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

Forget the spreadsheet, here’s an easy flowchart to know if a women owes you sex

Microsoft Excel took a turn for the explicit this week when the Internet learned the once-innocuous office tool was being used in a dispiriting new bro-trend: using the software to track of the number of times their partners refuse sex. Yes, #sexspreadsheets are a thing, presumably because some men still believe that owning of a penis entitles them to unlimited sexy times.

Sorry, guys, that’s just not the way the world works | Follow micdotcom 

(via becauseiamawoman)

— 3 days ago with 32729 notes
art-history-ftw:

Titian, Venus and Cupid, c.1550

art-history-ftw:

Titian, Venus and Cupid, c.1550

(via impressionsonmymind)

— 3 days ago with 48 notes
poboh:

Mondscheinlandschaften / Moonlight Landscape, Louis Douzette. Germany (1834 - 1924)

poboh:

Mondscheinlandschaften / Moonlight Landscape, Louis Douzette. Germany (1834 - 1924)

(via impressionsonmymind)

— 3 days ago with 304 notes
i-love-art:

Gustav Klimt, Upper Portion of Two Lovers, 1908

i-love-art:

Gustav Klimt, Upper Portion of Two Lovers, 1908

(Source: snowce, via post-impressionisms)

— 3 days ago with 3779 notes